Since 1918Celebrating 100 years

Fire at the cottage strikes fear in every cottager!   Knowing where the nearest fire pump is, and how to run it may be key to limiting the damage.

Ensure that your cottage/house is clearly marked with your 911 address - at the end of your driveway, and on your dock.  This will enable emergency personel to find and identify your cottage/house.  Info on how to obtain a 911 number sign in Georgian Bay township is <here>.

Always call 911 to report the fire - before attempting to contain it in any way.

Fire pump operating instructions are included <here>

Fire pump map below.

Dangers to be Aware of!

The Georgian Bay Fire Department wants to ensure all residents are safe while operating the portable pumps and would like any pump operators or other people on the scene of a wildland fire to consider the following dangers. 

  • Hydro lines – often fires are started by hydro lines that are broken this is extremely dangerous for people who are trying to put the fire out! Stay away from downed hydro lines and do not spray water in that area! 
  • Fuel sources- if a wildland fire has gotten close to a cottage or residence please consider that there may be fuel sources (propane tanks, portable gas tanks) that can worsen fire and are at risk for explosion. Please leave the area if the fire is near a fuel source. 
  •  Volunteer firefighters and or Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) wildland firefighters – once firefighters arrive on scene all public should exit the forest and make contact with the firefighter in charge. Fire hoses and water streams, trees being cut and water bombers are just some of the dangers that are present during wildland firefighting operations. 
  • Snakes- rattlesnakes are often known to curl up in the pump houses, be very cautious when removing the pump from the pump house. 
  • Attire- members of the public should be dressed appropriately if they act on a wild land fire. 
  • Heat Stroke- there is a greater chance of heat stroke with the physical and mental stress and heat that accompany wildland fires. 


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